About your Search

20121001
20121031
STATION
FOXNEWS 18
MSNBC 14
MSNBCW 14
CNNW 13
WMAR (ABC) 10
WRC (NBC) 10
KGO (ABC) 6
WTTG 6
WJLA (ABC) 5
WUSA (CBS) 5
CNBC 3
CNN 3
KPIX (CBS) 2
WBAL (NBC) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 134
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 134 (some duplicates have been removed)
already cancelling flights. even talk about shutting down the new york transit. hurricane irene wasn't that bad. i'm not going to worry this time, sam. >> dan, we were right over here. the thing about hurricane irene, we got to remember, it was a very bad storm, it brought a lot of rain and a lot of flooding to inland areas. it didn't do the coastal damage. all of the problems that you could have with this system, coastal damage is just one, then you have rain, wind and then flooding. in this case, you have snow as well. you got those five points. maybe one point wasn't as bad in irene in the biggest part of new york. but i'll tell you in the biggest population center of new york, but that was a bad storm for a lot of folks. be prepared for this storm to have a stronger coastal effects. it may be more wind and more rain if these forecasters are right this morning. our ginger zee is right now in atlantic city, where they're getting ready for that. i remember that coastline, it barely ramps out from the water to where those casinos are, good morning. >> i have lost everything. i have n
irene which do cause some minor flooding in this area. they're concerned this could cause major flooding. there was a study out of columbia university that said had hurricane irene been one foot worse it could have caused an additional $50 billion in damage. the fear here is that if the water comes up over this seawall, which is right here next to me, it could flood the subway tunnels, even the electrical grid here. mayor michael bloomberg said he's considering shutting down two electrical networks in lower manhattan. that would shut down power to some 17,000 people but it could quickly get much, much higher than that. as the day continues we're expecting this storm surge to grow. high tide is about 8:50 tonight. there's a full moon so it's an even higher tide than usual. if that storm surge of six to eleven feet hits right at that bad moment, that is what concerns them most, soledad. >> of course, john, it's cold! usually when we cover these hurricanes it's much warmer. but if they lose power, as many people are predicting, 10 million people up along the east coast could lose power, you
evacuations in the low-lying areas of queens and brooklyn. he ordered that in hurricane irene and thankfully, there were no problems at that time. but officials taking this very seriously, potentially flooding in brooklyn and queens on the atlantic ocean and new york bay, as hurricane sandy bears down on the northeast. we will have continuing live coverage, throughout the hour. >> the fox extreme weather alert for you, the national hurricane center issuing the latest advisory on hurricane sandy, set to strike in the north evert. a rare super storm. the hurricane lashing north carolina with pounding winds and rain. massive waves are crashing ark shore on the outer banks. people in connecticut are bracing for the worst with the governor declaring a state of emergency there. let's return to our chief meteorologist. you know, rick, we heard mayor michael bloomberg ordering mandatory evacuations for low-lying areas in brooklyn and queens. you are talking about hundreds and thousands of people and shutting down the subway and buses. >> this happened last year in hurricane irene and it wasn't that
here, the effects of sandy, are already worse than what we saw with irene. >> absolutely. absolutely. >> now, you see you have packed up the dog. you were under a mandatory evacuation, but you did decide to wait until this moment. did you think that there was a time you could actually ride it out? >> yeah. >> we did until the winds really started picking up. the tide wasn't going out at all, and it was well past high tide. >> i think a lot of public officials are going to be glad that you are heeding the warning and deciding to get out. i'm going to let you get on with your boat. thank you very much for waiting. suzanne, i also want you to take a look down the street here. the guy that you see in the scuba gear, his name is paul. he is a lifeguard. paul, come on over here and talk to me here for a moment. take off the goggles and what not. i know you have been down here in the neighborhood. you've been monitoring things. obviously, you're dressed appropriately for the occasion, but i know a lot of public officials want folks like you to head on out. >> um, yes. however, i'm real clos
bad trouble. >> reporter: last year during tropical storm irene the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. now sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many experts predicted. some people like this family who live in the evacuation zone are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> diapers, water, just, you know hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines at the supermarket. >> madhouse today. >> reporter: the streets are crackling with an upbeat preapocalyptic vibe. >> new yorker, what are you going to do? we are a new yorker. >> hard not to enjoy her spirit. the new york stock exchange will be closed. they're worried about keeping the power on all day long. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> it's lick thke that, new yor. keep on trucking. my drugstore was empty. our extreme weather team watching the maps and computer models overnight. >> meteorologist jim dickey joining us this morning with the very latest. what do you have, jim? >> well, sandy continues
, when hurricane irene came through and the flooding that i've seen down to my left here, going out underneath the boardwalk, out on the streets where all the homes are on long beach is already much, much worse than irene. further left, because of the conditions here and the camera angle, you can't see it. but there is a lifeguard station that last year 14 months ago in irene was swept off its foundation. it's done it again. the authorities have been appealing to people all day to get out. get out of long beach a get across the bridge. >> bret: stay safe. we will head further south and correspondent steve harrigan is in ocean city, maryland. good evening, steve. >> good evening, bret. hurricane force winds here cracking over the seawall. 15 to 20-foot waves. part of the pier has been destroyed by the waves. the governor making a forceful statement saying stay in your house. this storm is going to kill people. we want to limit the loss of life. stay in the house. as many as 30,000 people now without power. as the conditions are likely to continue to get worse throughout the night. br
much for the water to come up over the walls. last year, for hurricane irene, these residents had to be evacuated. so, this time around, they're ready for the worst. east coast communities going on the offensive. building sand walls, securing property and stocking up on supplies, as the superstorm closes in. after being pounded last year by hurricane irene with its record storm surge and feet of flooding, new york residents are once again bracing for the worst. damage from irene topped $14 billion. and sandy could wreak even more havoc. >> certainly having lived through it. i lost everything in my basement. i had up to ten feet of water in my house. this is a concern. >> reporter: governor cuomo has declared a state of emergency in preparation for sandy's impact. and mayor michael bloomberg warned new york city residents to brace themselves. >> there's the possibility of parts of our city flooding or high winds that could force certain bridges to be closed. >> reporter: last year, in advance of irene, mayor bloomberg made the unprecedented order to evacuate low-lying areas of the
. >> reporter: sandy could create a storm surge larger than last year's hurricane irene. possibly filling the subway tunnels with water. >> lower manhattan is the most vulnerable spot for a storm surge. >> no doubt about they expect this to be a large problem for central new jersey, including philadelphia, atlantic city, new york city all of the way up toward boston. something that we need to pay attenti attention to. >>> now, potentially new york city, where hurricane irene last year wasn't so bad in the city itself, what would you say to people who are tempted to write this off? >> i want to remind folks about that hurricane, it was a bad storm, dan, it just didn't deliver the wind damage that new york city expected and the surge wasn't really here. but if you look inland where it was catastrophic flooding and so many folks were acted that storm. it was a terrible storm. this storm hurricane center said that it will have all of those elements focused on these big population areas, and new york city is one of them. i'm going to ask everyone to be prepared. >> all right, better safe than
. >> reporter: last year, during tropical storm irene, the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. and now, sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many experts predicted, some people, like this family, who live in the evacuation zone, are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> we have diapers, we have water. you know, just hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines at the supermarket tonight. >> it really is a mad house. >> reporter: yeah. >> like, oh, my god. >> reporter: but the streets are crackling not with panic, but with a sort of upbeat, pre-apocalyptic vibe. >> i'm a new yorker. come on, what do you want to do? what do you want to do? panic? we're new yorkers. >> reporter: hard not to enjoy her spirit. agree with her or not. one last bit of news from new york, david. the new york stock exchange announcing late today that they will be closed tomorrow, however, people will still be able to trade stocks online electronically. back to you. >> she was a class
positions. we have had more water from sandy than we did last year from irene. we are being told that p rotectively, they're going to shut off power downhill since so have everybody has gotten somewhere safe and sandy is coming the question i s, how will new york city handle it? >> the big apple has been shut down to its core. lower manhattan looks like a ghost town at wall street will be closed for consecutive days because of weather for the first time since the 18 hundreds. and place we have to look up to see were many people live, spiked scrapers are a concern and wind speeds on the ground or half of those of those on the top floors sometimes forcing buildings to s way. >> the further up you live, the re reason you should close your dreams and just stay away from windows. >> reporter: watched the bath water sloshing a brooklyn high- rise in gusts of barely 40 miles an h our, half of what is expected by sandy. at ground zero still under construction special precautions as teams worked at two get machinery tied down and fears heightened by 10-ton steel arm dangling from a high-rise bui
into a couple a few minutes ago that was here last year during irene, got engaged, then said we will come back for our honeymoon and got the word of sandy. now they have to go wack to new york. y you want it tato talk about fol trying to make the best of this situation. >> to prevent problems, the utility had 150 minemen on the street today and 440 contractors as well as 300 tree trimmers. they started running robo calls and requested 2500 additional linemen to work after the storm. >> the u.s. navy is on the move tonight getting his ships out of norfolk and out of sandy's path. the ships, including the aircraft carrier, uss harry truman are going out it sea until the area is clear it return. they are the world's largest naval installation. no cancellations at the airports yet but major airlines are offering passengers a way out. putting flexible travel policies in place so that passengers can change or cancel flights next week without paying a fee. >> a lot of people are doing whatever they can to get ready for sandy. flood sag real concern. so folks are arming themselves with sandbags and st
including this one. so only twice before irene being one of them. here's why. the storm is still 24 to 36 hours away. the flow starting to flow up over that and you see this barrier, it could easily with a 10 to 20-foot rise wave up and there's the iconic boardwalk some being boarded up so taking it very seriously not only here in atlantic city but through the barrier islands up the jersey shore. and that's who it's going to hit. right to those graphics. i need to show you who will get what and when. that storm surge very important. i want to show you exactly what to expect here. 6 to 9 feet in that red area or 4 to 8 feet, excuse me, in that magenta area and then the blue still, you've got a 1 to 3-foot surge and all coming from the southeast end to the northwest. let me show you the wind forecast, because sam showed you how big and how many people will be involved in this. but look at how high those wind speeds go, 60 to 80 miles per hour, pittsburgh, d.c., new york city and boston in that red zone, and, of course, it extends all the way back to the eastern great lakes too. we'll watch
after hurricane irene which left people without power in that state for days. martha. martha: we'll find out what lessons were learned from irene at the same time as this last year. so many places out of power for so many days. we'll see whether or not we're in better shape this time around. airports across the northeast have been brought to a virtual stand still. that is causing a ripple effect for travelers around the country. airports across the new york city area are open. but carriers canceled 7600 flights. basically you're not going anywhere in and out of this area today and down to d.c. as well in many cases. some airlines added flights out of the northeast. so they can move their planes off the ground and out of the storm's path to other areas around the country. all of this adds to the travel nightmare and indeed amtrak as well is suspending their train service across the region. so folks, where you are is where you're going to sty for the time-being. the storm is shutting down the new york stock exchange. the last time that happened was almost 30 years ago. during hurricane glo
surge if it is as forecast, which will be worse than hurricane irene last year, could create some serious problems in terms of getting in to the subway system, in terms of getting into the con ed steam lines and potentially the electrical system. and so even if the wind doesn't blow out power, there could be pry empty differen preemptive power outages. so that's one of the many reasons that they decided to hunger down with all the financial markets. stay home, there's money to be made later and we'll just deal with it. for now just a little bit of a breeze blowing here. that is clearly supposed to chan change. >> where do you go later? >> you have to find a pole, right? you know that that's -- every guy out in a strong breeze, you've seen -- you've got to find a pole around there, right? >> i'll look for it. there's light poles and stuff, but i think i need to get a little further away from the water. >> yeah, that would be a good idea, too. >> we'll have to get him a bungee cord. okay. let's get a little bit more on the forecast on the storm in maria larosa. >> as you mentioned,
to clear but also to get, for example, the power companies back in. >> reporter: during hurricane irene last year, about 6 million homes lost electricity. this researcher plugged in all the information into a new program, and he believes this will be worse. >> our estimate at this point is 10 million. it could be higher. it could be lower. >> reporter: 10 million or more without power for a week to ten days, which is why this wisconsin company has added extra shifts, trying to build as many portable generators as quickly as possible. officials worry that residents might misuse some of those generators, putting them indoors, or stringing extension cords dangerously. many seem to be heeding the warnings, checking off their lists of preparedness, batteries, water, nonperishable food. >> i'm nervous about losing power. i'm nervous about the storm. >> reporter: some of the best advice from officials, if a tree takes down one of your power lines, leave the power line alone. leave the tree limb alone as well. let the power company take care of it. david kerley, abc news, rehoboth beach, delawa
.6 foot rise. that's going to bring the water because i remember i was here with irene, it was up to the top of these benches. now you're talking about water that's going to be about this high. so i think it's without question that we're going to flood the battery here. how much of this water gets in the subway system, i don't know. >> what about the wind? >> a lot of reports suggest -- what was that? >> are we going to see something like you see in kansas where you see roofs blown over after acres and acres of property. are we going to see that kind of wind damage in the northeast this time? >> reporter: don't think of what i'm getting here is representative of the wind because it's really not. i'm protected from the buildings. but we have gusts already out at montauk at 71. this is not like where you're going to have 130-mile-per-hour winds, so, no, the answer to that question is no, but there will be so much tree damage we think across interior pennsylvania and new york and new jersey, even parts of new england, back down through west virginia that that's a big concern. i mean,
irene. keep in mind we are still high -- i lost track of what time it is but high tide is not until 7:30 and the wind keeps on increasing. the tide's coming n. we've got more and more rain so all this water is just going to get so much worse and especially when you think that we are only at the very, very beginning of this storm. we still have at least 36 hours to go here in rehoboth beach with hurricane sandy. and this has been going on since yesterday at around 4:00 in the afternoon. that's when we first started to really feel wow, that is probably the first big gust that i felt since we've been out here. we've been seeing really sustained winds that have been increasing throughout the night. but really within the last half- hour or so is when we first started to feel these huge gusts just coming in from the beach. we've got wave heights of about well over 20 feet now off the shore and it's just going to keep on getting worse. yesterday i talked with the governor of delaware. he was saying that already yesterday afternoon it was looking so much worse then that it was at the peak of
is fells point that we saw with isabel and irene. sherrieionson is live. >> reporter: -- sherrie johnson is live with more. >> reporter: people are not taking any chances. they are taking full advantage of this huge pile of sand that you see right here. you know they are bracing for hurricane sandy. and fells point is no stranger to flooding. they have experienced problems with other storms in the past and on friday and saturday, many people loaded up on sandbags to help protect homes and businesses in the area from flooding. the city dumped a pile of sandbags at the broadway pier. city workers gav away 6 backs -- gav away 6 backs -- gave away 6 bags per person. the mayor wants people to be ready because of the magnitude of the storm. there are three sandbag centers opened to the public. a number of businesses in the area, we walked up and down the street and a number of businesses have sandbags in front of the store windows and front doors trying to protect themselves from heavy flooding. so people in fells point are taking major precautions here trying to protect themselves and bracing
yesterday. it's important to have as many in place before the storm swept in. we learned that from irene. we have about 1300 dedicated men and women right now for the restoration. that does not include those working on secondary, such as myself, people working 24-7. customer service, outside and inside, we are working in preparation for a storm. >> power outages are such a sensitive subject in this area, especially after the derecho. how will the response be different this time? >> it will be different because it started with communication. we sent out automated calls last week. we told our customers that it would be a long duration event. we told our customers better would be the potential for extended period of power lost throughout the metro area. we told our customers last week that it was critical clabber preparation plant, and emergency preparedness plan for their family. and for businesses as well as residential parentso we have tried to be more transparent and communicate with our customers. that way people have an expectation of what to expect and can make plans accordingly. >> than
's the number we're urging our residents to call. >> mr. gill, after irene and after the derecho, do you feel that you're better prepared, you know exactly what needs to happen for this storm? >> i believe the county is very much prepared to deal with what we are beginning -- [indiscernible] >> mr. gill, thank you very much. i do want to repeat ronald gill, jr. from the prince george's county 311 center says there is a shelter open. at 10:00 a.m. the richie coliseum will be open to shelter people on the campus of the university of maryland. again mr. gill, thank you and you be safe as well in this storm. >>> 9news team coverage of hurricane sandy continues with a look at things on the northeastern shore. kristin fisher is live along rehoboth beach in delaware with a look at conditions there. chris continue, we saw shots of the surf and it was really starting to kick up. >> reporter: definitely starting to kick up. you know this is not your normal hurricane when you are dressed in full ski gear to cover it. it is cold and getting colder. windy and getting so much windier. it is raining and it
nervous. >> you think it's going to be bad? >> i think so. >> i'm worried. we lucked out with irene, and i don't know. this may be worse. >> nbc's tom strong traung is l rehoboth beach, delaware. any residents left? >> they have about eight hours, the governor issues a mandatory evacuation area. everybody must be out by 8:00. look down the beach, have you several dozen people trying to get their last glimpse. right now, low tide. looks pretty impressive. come high tide, around 6:30, it wouldn't be a surprise if we didn't see water coming up to this fence here. all around rehoboth beach, a lot of businesses boarded up. people making runs to the grocery store, water short, bread is short. people did what they could in terms of preparation. they had about eight hours, around that time, this area will be shut down. cut off the bridges and roads into here it won't be a very pleasant place to stay if the electricity is going to go out. which is a likelihood. 2,000 utility workers and we're talking about the maryland/dc area, baltimore areas, and states of emergencies in those areas as well. a lo
, and the like. just to give you some perspective, last year, during irene, large sections of roads were washed away here in north carolina. power was knocked out to about half a million people, and seven people died. so, even -- and that was a low-end storm. i wouldn't really read in to much to the fact that this is a tropical storm or a low-end hurricane. either way the effects are going to be devastating and now is the time when people really do need to prepare, alex. >> i'm glad you're putting that reminder out there. it's absolutely true. just because it says tropical storm right now, don't let your guard down. julie martin, thanks for watching things for us from north carolina. we're going to check back in with dylan dreyer at the bottom of the hour for the very latest on the path of the storm. al roker will also be coming our way from delaware. >>> back to politics now. today republican presidential nominee mitt romney heads for florida to campaign with senator marco rubio. governor romney and vice presidential candidate paul ryan had a big rally in ohio, and today congressman ryan is on
back there is a storm fence put up. as i understand it, when hurricane irene hit, it came about that far, maybe a little further out. and with a lot of people at first were hesitant to evacuate because they said irene wasn't that bad. most of the damage of flooding was inland and not here on the coast. as you can see, the coast is just washed away. it's completely gone. as i said, it extends perhaps about 100 yards outs in na direction. the same situation from the north and cape may in the south, down near at alantic city towards the tip of new jersey and the garden state parkway the main highway into that area, which bisects of entire state, has been closed off because they don't want people to go back into that area. it's completely vevacuated, and right now somewhere from here to there is where the storm is expected to hit. we're going to take cover when we have to. we're in a position that's somewhat prekd prekted. it's enough protected we feel safe enough. again, things are deteriorating very quickly by the hour. >> all right. >> reporter: back to you guys. >> thank you, ro
through that we might know? >> exactly. it was very similar to hurricane irene last summer where the winds expanded several hundred miles out from the center of the storm. in a typical hurricane, most of the strong winds are near the core of the hurricane. in this case, obviously the strong winds were hundreds and hundreds of miles out from the center. that is very similar to hurricane irene last year. >> greta: do you fly straight through it? i imagine it's a rough ride and when you get to the eye of the storm it's calm. is that not what happens? >> well, we fly at 10,000 feet, and the idea is to go right through the center of the hurricane so you can measure the core of the storm, and then also measure the winds on the periphery of the storm, so it normally gets very rough right near the center and then typically out away from the center when the winds lighten up, it's not so bad any more, and in this case, for hurricane irene, at least on friday, the strong winds were well out from the center, and we had some really nasty stuff to go through on the north side of the storm, probably 105,
. a lot of people said they were not going to ride it out like they did irene. it's hard to say. you can see some of the windows in some of these high rises where there is power to them, generator power or what have you, but obviously it's very dark down here in lower manhattan with the power that's been shut off on purpose in many areas and that's the con edison said that they are doing that so they can easily -- more easily restore power once this storm goes through. but they've got a lot on their hands tonight, as we mentioned, with that explosion on one of the transformers on the other side. >> ida single, thank you so much. if we can go back to that video that we were just looking at, for people that have not seen the coverage throughout the evening, this is a picture of a crane atop a luxury high rise in midtown manhattan. it has been dangling precariously, dangerously off the top of that building which has become known in manhattan as the global billionaire's club because the nine full floors at the top have been sold to billionaires. two of the dupe pleks are $90 million each. yo
mean, twhapd during irene? >> caller: well, i have to tell you, i was here personally, the same way. and probably, it was exactly the same scenario. i think most people are heeding the warning and are staying home and staying put. and that's allowing them to stay safe and not, you know, causing the unnecessary injury or illness from occurring. >> yeah. similarity. so, so far, so good, right? >> caller: so far, so good. we are keeping our fingers crossed. like i said, we have extra staff on board tonight. everybody's bunking out at the hospital. we are waiting to see, you know, if we are needed. >> doctor, this is heather, i did want to ask you a question. i know you don't want to talk specifically about the situation right now at the new york medical center where they are evacuating people. but what happens when have you patients who are on ventilators? they have at least four infants on ventilator there is. they are having to evacuate them and take them out of the hospital, carry patients down the stairwells. how do do you that? >> caller: well, very carefully, obviously. but what
surge right now, that's just the water rise alone with this, 6.6 feet. that's 2.2 feet higher than irene. we're awaiting that high tide coming up. for example, irene was about right here, all right, and what we could see with another two and a half feet is up through here. >> no campaigning for the president. he is locked down at the white house, telephoning governors and mayors and meeting with fema. >> mitt romney is not campaigning but holding what his campaign calls a hurricane relief event coincidentally in battleground ohio. >> we have a lot of goods here and i know there's more coming in and we're going to box these things up in just a minute and put them on some trucks and then we're going to send them into i think it's new jersey. >> new yorkers ordered off the streets last night it was a lonely late night for letterman and fallon. no live audiences to laugh at their jokes. >> got up this morning, turned on the radio and listened for the talk show closings. i have no luck. >> talk show closings. >> yeah. >> that's a play on -- >> wait a minute. i think i hear people banging at t
million people could lose power. that compares to about 7 million that lost power during irene. and it could take a week to get everybody back up and running because they won't be able to start putting things back together again until probably wednesday and it will be another five to seven days after that. big, big hit to the economy. >> paul, thank you so much. i know you're going to be with us for the next few days as we continue to work through hurricane sandy. thank you, paul. >>> all right. tyler, over to you. >> thank you, sue. hurricane sandy of course bearing down, point pleasant, new jersey. some utilities bracing for the worse. we just talk a little bit about that. warning customers that they could be out of power for a week, ten days, maybe more. what kind of damage are we talking about here and will some utilities perform better than others. greg gordon is senior managing director at isi group. mr. gordon, welcome, good to see you. can any utility that will be affected by this storm be described as a potential winner? >> no. look, these companies are regulated. they
the number of i want pacted households as hurricane irene. >> reporter: as new jersey surveys the damage, sandy is now soaking areas inland downing trees and power lines in its path. and new jersey's governor said the losses there are incalculable. certainly in the billions. >> we're just looking at the video all those boats stacked up together and stuff. where do you start on something so massive? >> reporter: well, you just start from the beginning like they are here on delaware shore. already there are earth movers here dumping sand into all the holes that have been made here. the crews are out here already starting to clear the paths and getting the power lines back up. so really it's going to be weeks and months of clean-up and getting everything going again. it's just one day at a time. >> all right, susan mcginnis live in delaware, thank you. >>> and we are just learning that president obama has announced that he is going to travel tomorrow to new jersey to survey some of the damage there. >> indeed. >>> meanwhile, millions of people from maine to the carolinas are without power a
responder during hurricane irene. >> on saturday, gov. christie declared a state of emergency in anticipation of the devastating weather hurricane sandy is expected to bring. >> the tsunami warning ny has been downgraded to advisory. it appears it has -- it appears hawaii has escaped serious damage. -- the tsunami warning in hawaii has been downgraded to an advisory. the waves were smaller than predicted. no major damage was reported. tune into wbal at 9:00 tonight for conditions and emergency response. we will continue the coverage following sunday night football for an early morning updates, we're scheduled to begin at 4:00 a.m.. coming up, we will update you on the status of hurricane sandy. so anyway, i've been to a lot of places. you know, i've helped a lot of people save a lot of money. but today...( sfx: loud noise of metal object hitting the ground) things have been a little strange. (sfx: sound of piano smashing) roadrunner: meep meep. meep meep? (sfx: loud thud sound) what a strange place. geico®. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insuran
for irene. we decided to board it up there. there was no damage. there is a thousand dollar deductible on the windows if they break. it is $200 to board them up. this seemed to be the best thing do again. >> reporter: local handyman says he has five stores on his to do list today. >> windier the better. bring the wind and rain. >> reporter: decent payday thanks to sandy. >> we love helping people. >> reporter: we ain't scared of sandy, my personal theme the vodka is safe. all businesses in this area were ordered closed as of 6:00. delaware's governor says a positive attitude is nice. staying safe is better. >> delaware is a resilient place. we have seen storms before. if you listen to the experts with every passing minute they are confident this is going to be bad and we are not going to be spared the worse of it. >> for tonight the worse could be coming. high tide is expected to be at 7:32. within 40 minutes it is going to be a tide that will get here. it is already passed over the entire beach up to the dune barrier that keeps the ocean away from the board walk here. you mentioned ro
iran, which everybody thought you know, how come we did not get strong winds, irene was dragging in dry air from the west. still a $15 billion store. this comes out from the southeast and the problem you have with that is you look at atlantic city beaches or down in delaware and maryland, those beaches have the water piling up and in. 1944 hurricane destroyed the entire atlantic city boardwalk in past 50-60 miles to the east. this has the possibility to have unprecedented storm surges. i believe it is a pick your poison. if it is further north, you can send a storm surge through long island where you are actually piling water up good this is a very situation. dagen: i love seeing you, joe. next time, i hope it is something else we can talk about. [ laughter ] >> i will come on and talk about nice weather. dagen: thank you. that does not help us at all. you have been talking about this exact type of storm. in memory. several years. thank you so much. eleven days until we go to the voting booth and elect the next president of the united states and that we have this morning's gross domesti
is that we kind of had those same warnings for irene. i don't want people to go oh, they just say that all the time just to get our attention. but, no, there is potential for some dire stuff going on here. and we're talking about power down -- power lines down trees down, all kinds of other things. finally the computers are agreeing. and you can see a couple doing loops. if this thing does a loop right over new york or new jersey or pennsylvania, that means 24 to 36 hours of rain coming down an inch in an hour. do the math. that's a couple feet of potential water. here we go. the potential impacts, i think the coastal infland flooding the biggest. obviously we saw that in vermont from irene. the waves will be larger than 30 feet battering long island, new rhode island all the way to massachusetts and new jersey depending on where it lands. coastal erosion. we could lose homes as the beach gets washed away and power outages could be in the millions taking literally maybe a week to get all those power lines back up. and that could be far enough that it could affect the ele
. >> the fear is it's going to be worse than irene. >> tonight full reports from up and down the east coast. >> it's only a matter of time as this system gets closer. >> governor martin o'malley over the battering in baltimore. and ted strickland on what the storm means for the political storm in ohio. >>> good to have you with us tonight, folks. sandy is expected to make landfall at this hour on the coast of new jersey. the storm is now a post tropical cyclo cyclone. the path on the northeast corridor has been slow and moving very wide. hundreds of thousands of people in coastal areas have been evacuated up and down the east coast. this is a live shot from delaware. we'll get a live update from the shoreline in just a moment. authorities say new york city and long island could get the worst of the storm surge. sea water could rise up to 11 feet. the damage from sandy was on display hundreds of feet above manhattan today. you're seeing a youtube video of a crane collapsing on the 57th street high-rise. city officials say workers would not be able to access the crane to keep it from falling.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 134 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)